Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Lecture Schedule Spring


To attend a Course Lecture or S-Lecture, you must contact the TSU office by email or phone at 505-332-4253 and ask to be placed on the enrollment list for a particular lecture or seminar. Out of consideration for the professor and all those involved in the preparation of courses, your call should be made as much in advance of the scheduled start of the lecture as possible. Course lectures for which a minimum number of students have not enrolled may be cancelled. Unless your name is on the enrollment list, we will not be able to contact you in the event of a course lecture cancellation or change of venue. Remember that even if a particular course title appears on your active registration, you are not automatically enrolled in the associated lecture. 

Anyone may audit any of the courses listed below by contacting the Administrative Offices. The audit fee for a 14 week course is $150.00. The audit fee for a 7 week course is $95.00.

Tel: 505-332-4253;
Email: admin@tsu-edu.us

 

SPRING SESSION 1  – WEEKLY COURSE LECTURE/SEMINARS

EXPOSITION OF HEBREWS
Mondays, February  6, 13, 20, 27, March 6, 13, 20; 6:30 pm. to 9:30 pm
The book of Hebrews is described as a unique writing in the New Testament connecting the Old Testament to the New Testament. This course will facilitate the student’s serious engagement with the following subject areas: the author, approximate date of writing, the historical context of Hebrews; the writer’s primary purpose in writing the book; and the principal doctrines of the Christian faith as set forth in the book.
Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD; TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE
Tuesdays,  January 9, 16; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
FUNDAMENTALS OF FIELD SUPERVISING: A detailed study of the methods of archaeological excavation, as well as the fundamental protocols and procedures utilized by the various supervisory staff members during an excavation season. This lecture/seminar covers everything from procedural decision-making to data collection and required paperwork to crew management and field etiquette. The evolution of archaeological methodologies and various methodological theories will also be discussed. Prerequisite: two weeks of hands-on excavation experience (preferably with TeHEP).
Phil Silvia, Ph.D.; TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

NT GREEK GRAMMAR & SYNTAX I
Tuesdays, January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 6
This is an introduction to NT Greek.  It covers Koine Greek history, alphabet and grammar, focusing on nouns, prepositions and their modifiers.  Phrasing and syntax diagramming will be introduced and developed alongside the grammar. The required textbook for this course is “Basics of Biblical Greek Grammar” 3rd ed.  by William Mounce.  The companion workbook (BBG workbook, by Mounce) is required for course credit & recommended for those auditing or taking the course as a module.
Jeannine Bulot, Doctoral Fellow; TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

SPRING SESSION 2  – WEEKLY COURSE LECTURE/SEMINARS

EXPOSITION OF HEBREWS
Mondays, April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 May 7, 14; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
This is a continuation of the study of the book of Hebrews from Spring Session 1.  This course will facilitate the student’s serious engagement with the following subject areas: the author, approximate date of writing, the historical context of Hebrews; the writer’s primary purpose in writing the book; and the principal doctrines of the Christian faith as set forth in the book.
Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD; TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE
Tuesdays, beginning March 20, 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, surround current events, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.
Steven Collins, PhD; TSU Archaeology Research Center – 7200 Jefferson St. NE, Suite B

NT GREEK GRAMMAR & SYNTAX II
Tuesdays, March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 17, 24, May 1; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
This class continues the study of NT Greek. The primary focus will be the Greek Verb and incorporating its use with knowledge gained in the previous class.  We will continue to syntax diagram increasingly complex sentences equipping the student with the ability to perform exegesis of the Biblical Greek documents.
Jeannine Bulot, Doctoral Fellow; TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

 

SPRING BLOCK COURSES & INTENSIVES

AR547 EXCAVATION PRACTICUM & FIELD SCHOOL
4 February through 8 March
On-site, hands-on experience in Near Eastern archaeology at an excavation project approved by the TSU College of Archaeology & Biblical History. Generally held in Israel and/or Jordan, this field experience brings the student into direct contact with applied archaeological methods and techniques, and also includes the exploration and study of historical/biblical sites in selected regions. Select Bible Lands Expedition itineraries may also qualify under this course title.

Dr. Phillip Silvia & Faculty, Tall el-Hammam Excavation, Jordan

AR657 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS
4 Febuary through 8 March
The rigor and procedures of archaeological data collection and the fundamentals of excavation methods and techniques are covered in this course of study. Practical instruction in archaeological protocol(s) are discussed and evaluated. The use of current and emerging technologies, the integration of relevant disciplines, archaeometric techniques, and modern cultural protocols are topics of discussion. The student will come away with a good sense of how an excavation project is organized, operated, and funded.
Dr. Phillip Silvia & Faculty, Tall el-Hammam Excavation, Jordan

AR517 NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY: BACKGROUND & METHODS
March 22-24, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
This course examines the historical relationship between archaeology and the Bible, including: important personalities in, and contributors to, the field of Near Eastern and biblical archaeology; synchronizing ancient Near Eastern and biblical chronologies; important archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible; the foundations of archaeological methods and protocols; ascertaining the difference between archaeological realities and hoaxes; and the necessity of a dialogical relationship between archaeology and biblical studies.
Dr. Brian Janeway & Faculty, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

AR559 ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORY OF THE JERUSALEM TEMPLE
April 26-28, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The Temple Mount in Old Jerusalem is probably the most controversial piece of real estate in the history of the world. Its history and archaeology are partly historical fact, partly reasoned speculation, with a smattering of urban legend. This course traces the successive control and/or use of this sacred precinct by the ancient Canaanites, Jebusites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Selucids, Hasmoneans, Herodians, Romans, Byzantines, Moslems, and Crusaders, with particular emphasis on the history, architecture and archaeology of the First (Solomonic) and Second (Herodian) Temple Periods.
Dr. Steven Collins & Faculty, Veritas International University, 3000 W. MacArthur Blvd., Kwave Bldg., 2nd Floor

AR627 ARCHAEOLOGY & THE BIBLE: HISTORICAL & CULTURAL SYNCHRONISMS
May 10-12; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
Integrating biblical history into the histories of ancient Near Eastern kingdoms has often been generic and minimalistic, frequently emphasizing general cultural phenomena without substantive cause/effect correlations. This course identifies and details cause/effect synchronisms between biblical and ancient Near Eastern histories—Egypt, Hatti, Mittani, Assyria, Babylonia, and the Levant—as well as elements of cultural specificity embedded in the biblical narratives, all of which demonstrate the historical authenticity and veracity of the Old Testament, with particular focus on the Torah, Joshua, and Judges
Dr. Steven Collins, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4