Friday, August 17, 2018

Lecture Schedule Fall


To attend a course Lecture or S-Lecture, you must contact the TSU office by email or phone at 505-332-4253 and ask to be placed on the enrollment list for a particular lecture or seminar. Out of consideration for the professor and all those involved in the preparation of courses, your call should be made as much in advance of the scheduled start of the lecture as possible. Course lectures for which a minimum number of students have not enrolled may be cancelled. Unless your name is on the enrollment list, we will not be able to contact you in the event of a course lecture cancellation or change of venue. Remember that even if a particular course title appears on your active registration, you are not automatically enrolled in the associated lecture.

Anyone may audit any of the courses listed below by contacting the Administrative Offices. The audit fee for a 14 week course is $150.00. The audit fee for a 7 week course is $95.00.

Telephone: 505-332-4253
Email: admin@tsu-edu.us

 

FALL SESSION 1 – WEEKLY COURSE LECTURE/SEMINARS

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 1st CENTURY TO 1500
Mondays, September 10, 17, 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
The course is a survey course in the history of Christian thought not a course in Church history. The primary goal of this course is to investigate the major interactions between Christian thought and practice within its cultural background throughout its history.   Students will learn of major patterns within Christian thought, major figures within these patterns, and major cultural interactions. The student will become familiar with the major events and figures in the history of Christian thought and will be able to form an assessment of the effect of Christian thought throughout history as well as the effect it has today.
Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE
Tuesdays, September 4, 11, 18, 25, October 2, 9, 16, 23; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.
Steven Collins, PhD, TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

BIBLICAL HEBREW: GRAMMAR & SYNTAX I
Thursdays, September 6, 13, 20, 27, October 4, 11, 18; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
This course introduces the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew, the language of the Old Testament.  It covers the alphabet and it introduces the noun inflection and system of agreement.  It works through the verb inflection system with particular emphasis on verbal aspect and begins to give the student the opportunity to see how these tools are employed in the analysis of actual Hebrew texts.  It sets the foundation for the student to appreciate the richness of Old Testament Hebrew.
Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c), TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

FALL SESSION 2 – WEEKLY COURSE LECTURE/SEMINARS

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 1500′s  TO PRESENT
Mondays, October 29, November 5, 12, 19, 26, December 3, 10
The course is a survey course in the history of Christian thought not a course in Church history. The primary goal of this course is to investigate the major interactions between Christian thought and practice within its cultural background throughout its history.   Students will learn of major patterns within Christian thought, major figures within these patterns, and major cultural interactions. The student will become familiar with the major events and figures in the history of Christian thought and will be able to form an assessment of the effect of Christian thought throughout history as well as the effect it has today.
Matthew Valerio-Hitschfeld, PhD, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE
Tuesdays, October 30, November 6, 13, 20, 27, December 4, 11
These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.
Steven Collins, PhD, TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

BIBLICAL HEBREW: GRAMMAR & SYNTAX II
Thursdays, October 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13; 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
The prerequisite for this course is Biblical Hebrew Grammar & Syntax I.
This course continues the process of building usable skills in order to effectively analyze actual Hebrew texts.  It continues the process of working through the intricacies of the Hebrew language structure and verbs, while presenting insights only evident when reading the Bible in its original language.
Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c), TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

FALL SESSION 1 – BLOCK COURSES & INTENSIVES

AR697 BRONZE AGE & BIBLICAL HISTORY
September 20-22; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The Early and Intermediate Bronze Age world of the pre-Abrahamic patriarchs; the Middle Bronze Age of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph; the Late Bronze backdrop of Moses, the Exodus, and the Israelite Conquest of Canaan—these are examined in this course which puts emphasis on ancient Near Eastern material culture, predominantly in the southern Levant. Topics include settlement dynamics, sedentary vs. nomadic populations, utilization of natural resources, city-state development, architecture, sanitation, burial customs, and how biblical history meshes with the Levantine Bronze Age. [Note: the master’s thesis may replace this course.]
Steven Collins, PhD, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

BS641 NT CONTEXTS & INTER-TESTAMENTAL HISTORY
September 27-29; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The events that occurred between the close of the Old Testament and the ministry of Jesus Christ provide the context in which the early followers of Christ lived and wrote. Understanding these diverse influences such as the Maccabean era and the Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Scriptures is essential to understanding the world of the New Testament. This course will provide students with a foundational knowledge of the social, cultural and historical contexts that formed the backdrop of early Christianity and the New Testament writings.
Craig Olson, PhD, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

AR617 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE BIBLE LANDS
October 18-20; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
This course offers a detailed examination of the geographical areas of the Bible Lands from an historical perspective, including important geographical, geological and topographical features of major regions and sub-locales. How the land affected population movements and cultural developments will also be addressed. Biblical events will be set amidst the geo-politico-cultural milieus of the ancient Near East. Select Bible Land Expedition itineraries may also qualify under this course title.
John W. Moore, PhD, TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

FALL SESSION 2 – BLOCK COURSES & INTENSIVES

AR511 NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY: BACKGROUND & METHODS
November 8-10; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
This course examines the historical relationship between archaeology and the Bible, including: important personalities in, and contributors to, the field of Near Eastern and biblical archaeology; synchronizing ancient Near Eastern and biblical chronologies; important archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible; the foundations of archaeological methods and protocols; ascertaining the difference between archaeological realities and hoaxes; and the necessity of a dialogical relationship between archaeology and biblical studies.
Brian Janeway, PhD, Prof. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Veritas International University
TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

AR537 ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORY OF ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA
December 6-8; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
In the light of the Mesopotamian origins of the Hebrew patriarchs, this course overviews the history and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia as a cultural backdrop for much of the OT narrative. Significant focus is placed on the rise and fall of the Mesopotamian kingdoms of Sumer, Akkad, Babylonia, Mittani, and Assyria. By examining details of ancient Mesopotamian history and culture, light is shed on many sections of biblical narrative.
Dr. Mark Chavalas, Prof., History of the Ancient Near East
University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse
TSU HUSTED HALL – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

BS642 NT: GOSPEL & ACTS
December 13-15; 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The four Gospels and the Book of Acts can be described as the narrative of the activity of the Holy Spirit through the life, ministry, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ and the lives and ministries of his apostles. This course will facilitate the student’s serious engagement with the following subject areas: the historical and cultural context of the New Testament; the author, approximate date of writing, theological agenda, primary intended audience, principal message, and major themes of each of the historical books; the literary relationship among the five historical books; and the preaching and teaching of Jesus Christ in the Gospels and Peter, Stephen, and Paul in the Book of Acts.
Craig Olson, PhD, TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4