Lecture Schedule

Fall

Weekly Course Lecture/Seminars

Session 1

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 1st CENTURY TO 1500

September 10, 17, 24 / October 1, 8, 15, 22

Mondays 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description

The course is a survey course in the history of Christian thought not a course in Church history. The primary goal of this course is to investigate the major interactions between Christian thought and practice within its cultural background throughout its history.   Students will learn of major patterns within Christian thought, major figures within these patterns, and major cultural interactions. The student will become familiar with the major events and figures in the history of Christian thought and will be able to form an assessment of the effect of Christian thought throughout history as well as the effect it has today.

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE

September 4, 11, 18, 25 / October 2, 9, 16, 23

Tuesdays 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

Description

These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.

BIBLICAL HEBREW: GRAMMAR & SYNTAX I

September 5, 12, 19, 26 / October 3, 10, 22

Wednesdays 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c)

TSU Husted Hall, 7600 Jefferson NE, Suite 4

Description

This course introduces the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew, the language of the Old Testament.  It covers the alphabet and it introduces the noun inflection and system of agreement.  It works through the verb inflection system with particular emphasis on verbal aspect and begins to give the student the opportunity to see how these tools are employed in the analysis of actual Hebrew texts.  It sets the foundation for the student to appreciate the richness of Old Testament Hebrew.

Session 2

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 1500′s TO PRESENT

October 29 / November 5, 12, 19, 26 / December 3, 10

Mondays

Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description

The course is a survey course in the history of Christian thought not a course in Church history. The primary goal of this course is to investigate the major interactions between Christian thought and practice within its cultural background throughout its history.   Students will learn of major patterns within Christian thought, major figures within these patterns, and major cultural interactions. The student will become familiar with the major events and figures in the history of Christian thought and will be able to form an assessment of the effect of Christian thought throughout history as well as the effect it has today.

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE

October 30 / November 6, 13, 20, 27 / December 4, 11

Tuesdays

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description

These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.

BIBLICAL HEBREW: GRAMMAR & SYNTAX II

October 24, 31 / November 7, 14, 28 / December 5, 12

Wednesdays 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c)

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description

The prerequisite for this course is Biblical Hebrew Grammar & Syntax I.

This course continues the process of building usable skills in order to effectively analyze actual Hebrew texts.  It continues the process of working through the intricacies of the Hebrew language structure and verbs, while presenting insights only evident when reading the Bible in its original language.

Block Courses & Intensives

Session 1

AR697 BRONZE AGE & BIBLICAL HISTORY

September 20-22

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
The Early and Intermediate Bronze Age world of the pre-Abrahamic patriarchs; the Middle Bronze Age of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph; the Late Bronze backdrop of Moses, the Exodus, and the Israelite Conquest of Canaan—these are examined in this course which puts emphasis on ancient Near Eastern material culture, predominantly in the southern Levant. Topics include settlement dynamics, sedentary vs. nomadic populations, utilization of natural resources, city-state development, architecture, sanitation, burial customs, and how biblical history meshes with the Levantine Bronze Age. [Note: the master’s thesis may replace this course.]

BS681 THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT THE OLD TESTAMENT

December 10, 11, 12

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Craig Olson, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
According to the Hebrew tradition, the canonical structure of the Old Testament consists of four parts: the Torah, the Early Prophets, the Latter Prophets, and the Writings. According to the Christian tradition, the canonical structure of the Old Testament consists of five parts: the Pentateuch (i.e., the five books of Moses), the Historical Books, the Wisdom Literature, the Major Prophets, and the Minor Prophets. Among the subject areas addressed in this course are the following: the major overarching theological themes of the Hebrew Scriptures; the process of establishing the canonical structure of the Old Testament according to both the Hebrew tradition and the Christian tradition; the significance and method of handling the chronological information embedded into the Hebrew Scriptures; the documentary theories and hypotheses relating to the development of the Hebrew Scriptures; date and authorship of each of the Old Testament books; and the theological themes contributed by each of the individual books.

AR617 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE BIBLE LANDS

October 18-20

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

John W. Moore, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This course offers a detailed examination of the geographical areas of the Bible Lands from an historical perspective, including important geographical, geological and topographical features of major regions and sub-locales. How the land affected population movements and cultural developments will also be addressed. Biblical events will be set amidst the geo-politico-cultural milieus of the ancient Near East. Select Bible Land Expedition itineraries may also qualify under this course title.

Session 2

AR511 NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY: BACKGROUND & METHODS

November 8-10

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Brian Janeway, PhD, Prof. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Veritas International University

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This course examines the historical relationship between archaeology and the Bible, including: important personalities in, and contributors to, the field of Near Eastern and biblical archaeology; synchronizing ancient Near Eastern and biblical chronologies; important archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible; the foundations of archaeological methods and protocols; ascertaining the difference between archaeological realities and hoaxes; and the necessity of a dialogical relationship between archaeology and biblical studies.

AR537 ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORY OF ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA

December 6-8

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dr. Mark Chavalas, Prof. History of the Ancient Near East
University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
In the light of the Mesopotamian origins of the Hebrew patriarchs, this course overviews the history and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia as a cultural backdrop for much of the OT narrative. Significant focus is placed on the rise and fall of the Mesopotamian kingdoms of Sumer, Akkad, Babylonia, Mittani, and Assyria. By examining details of ancient Mesopotamian history and culture, light is shed on many sections of biblical narrative.

BS682 THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT THE NEW TESTMENT

December 10, 11, 12

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Craig Olson, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

This lecture has been cancelled. 

Spring

Weekly Course Lecture/Seminars

Session 1

THEOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT

February  4, 11, 18, 25 / March 4, 11, 18

Mondays 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This course will give the student and introduction to definitions of; kerygma, euangelion, and the gospel. The purpose of the course is to define two principles of the New Testament: the Kingdom of God, and the righteous believer. It will also define the gospel, is components, the use of the Gospel in the Epistles, and how to correctly apply the Gospel for both personal and church growth. This course is designed to be inductive and interactive with focus on personal discovery.

BIBLICAL HEBREW: GRAMMAR & SYNTAX II (continued)

January 9, 16, 23, 20/February 6, 13, 20

Wednesdays 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c)

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

The prerequisite for this course is Biblical Hebrew Grammar & Syntax I

Description

This course continues the process of building usable skills in order to effectively analyze actual Hebrew texts.  It continues the process of working through the intricacies of the Hebrew language structure and verbs, while presenting insights only evident when reading the Bible in its original language.  There is no required text for this session, we will parse & exegete select passages from the Hebrew Bible.

Session 2

THEOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT

April 1, 8, 15, 22, 19 /  May 6, 13

Mondays 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Matthew Valerio-Hirschfeld, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This is a continuation of the study of the Theology of the New Testament begun in Spring, Session 1.  This course will give the student and introduction to definitions of; kerygma, euangelion, and the gospel. The purpose of the course is to define two principles of the New Testament: the Kingdom of God, and the righteous believer. It will also define the gospel, is components, the use of the Gospel in the Epistles, and how to correctly apply the Gospel for both personal and church growth. This course is designed to be inductive and interactive with focus on personal discovery.

ARCHAEOLOGY OPEN SEMINAR/LECTURE

Beginning March 19

Tuesdays 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Archaeology Research Center – 7200 Jefferson St. NE, Suite B

Description
These lectures will be dealing with the issues and topics in archaeology that are needed by students, surround current events, or are of a general interest. Collection of seven of these lectures/seminars will constitute a module for course credit.

ARAMAIC GRAMMAR & SYNTAX

March 13, 20, 27/April 3, 10, 17, 24/May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29/June 5, 12

Wednesdays 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c)

TSU Justed Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

The prerequisite for this course is Biblical Hebrew Grammar & Syntax I

Description

This course is the study of the classical Aramaic of the 1st millennium BCE; particularly from the Neo-Babylonian Period. The differences between Aramaic & Biblical Hebrew will be noted & discussed & we will parse & exegete the Book of Daniel for the purpose of illuminating biblical text.  There is a required textbook for this course.

Block Courses & Intensives

AR541 EXCAVATION PRACTICUM & FIELD SCHOOL

27 January through 28 February 2019

TeHEP Staff

Tall el-Hammam Excavation, Jordan

Description
On-site, hands-on experience in Near Eastern archaeology at an excavation project approved by the TSU College of Archaeology & Biblical History. Generally held in Israel and/or Jordan, this field experience brings the student into direct contact with applied archaeological methods and techniques, and also includes the exploration and study of historical/biblical sites in selected regions. Select Bible Lands Expedition itineraries may also qualify under this course title.

AR651 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS

27 January through 28 February 2019

TeHEP Staff

Tall el-Hammam Excavation, Jordan

Description
The rigor and procedures of archaeological data collection and the fundamentals of excavation methods and techniques are covered in this course of study. Practical instruction in archaeological protocol(s) are discussed and evaluated. The use of current and emerging technologies, the integration of relevant disciplines, archaeometric techniques, and modern cultural protocols are topics of discussion. The student will come away with a good sense of how an excavation project is organized, operated, and funded.

AR641 LEVANTINE CERAMIC TYPOLOGY

March 21-23

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This course examines the chronological sequencing of ancient Levantine (Israel, Lebanon, Syria and the Transjordan) pottery types founded on both form-based and function-based methodologies that analyzes the general morphology, clay-body (fabric), and surface treatment of period and regional ceramics, yielding a reasonably reliable system of dating pottery-bearing archaeological strata. Hands-on inspection of whole vessels and sherds (rims, handles, bases and body sherds) provides support of textbook information.

AR562 ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT PERIOD

April 11-13

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Jeannine Bulot, PhD(c)

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
This course examines the material culture of the New Testament era as revealed through the archaeological record of the Early Roman Period Levant, Asia Minor, and other important Roman sites mentioned in Scripture. Socio-cultural phenomena, as well as art, architecture and political structures are introduced. Emphasis is placed on archaeological data illuminating the text of the New Testament.

AR621 ARCHAEOLOGY & THE BIBLE: HISTORICAL & CULTURAL SYNCHRONISMS

May 9-11

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Steven Collins, PhD

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
Integrating biblical history into the histories of ancient Near Eastern kingdoms has often been generic and minimalistic, frequently emphasizing general cultural phenomena without substantive cause/effect correlations. This course identifies and details cause/effect synchronisms between biblical and ancient Near Eastern histories—Egypt, Hatti, Mittani, Assyria, Babylonia, and the Levant—as well as elements of cultural specificity embedded in the biblical narratives, all of which demonstrate the historical authenticity and veracity of the Old Testament, with particular focus on the Torah, Joshua, and Judges.

Summer

Weekly Course Lecture/Seminars

TBD

Block Courses & Intensives

AR655 Archaeological Laboratory (2 units)

13-15 June 2019 (ABQ)

AR670 Archaeological Documentary Media (2 units)

18-20 July 2019 (ABQ)

AR631 Languages & Cultures of the Ancient Near East (2 units)

August 15-17

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

TSU Husted Hall – 7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 4

Description
The biblical landscape is populated with diverse cultures and people groups, and are an integral part of that history. This course introduces the student to the languages and writing systems of the ancient Near East (this is not a language course, but aimed at general familiarization), as well as to the peoples and kingdoms of the region, such as the Egyptians, the Mesopotamians, the Hittites, the Mittani, the Hurrians, the Canaanites, the Amorites, the Philistines, and others.

Your Cart